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Aug 14 2014

New publications are available at the Scout Report!

World War One: The British Library

The British Library has gone above and beyond with this multimedia collection of materials related to World War One. Offered as a form of scholarly rumination and educational resource, the site examines key themes in the history of the Great War, along with 50 newly commissioned historical articles, teachers’ notes, and much more. First-time visitors might look over the Explore area to find manuscripts, illustrations, letters, maps, and other items contributed by several dozen European institutions. The Teaching Resources includes 40 different items that cover topics such as aerial warfare, propaganda, and bombing raids. The Articles section is a masterstroke and it covers the lives of soldiers, civilians, and colonial troops.

Chicago Fed Blogs

The Chicago Federal Reserve has distilled some of its more academic works into this series of informative musings. The Community Development & Policy Studies (CDPS) blog brings together commentaries from staff members as well as guest commentators. CDPS is actually a division of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago that helps support the System’s economic growth objectives by promoting community development. On the blog, visitors can look over meditations on recent conferences dealing with city revitalization in the Rustbelt, along with musings on home ownership, urban infrastructure projects, and much more. Visitors can search through all of the posts or also navigate to a story of interest via the word cloud.

From Confinement to College: Video Oral Histories of Japanese American Students in World War II

This remarkable collection brings together video oral histories of Japanese Americans students during World War II. Created by a team of researchers at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, these interviews document the impact that students’ wartime experiences had on their college years as well as the rest of their lives. All told, there are eighteen oral histories here and visitors can learn about the lives of Gordon Sato, Frank Inami, and Rose Yamaguchi, among others. Visitors may especially be interested in learning about the students’ time in the relocation centers and internment camps scattered around the United States. All told, it’s a moving and thoughtful collection that will be enjoyed by anyone with an interest in American history.

[Source: Scout Report, Volume 20, Number 30, August 8, 2014]

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Jul 28 2014

New publications are available at the Scout Report!

Dawn of the Smart City? Perspectives From New York, Ahmedabad, Sao Paulo, and Beijing

Are we in the age of the smart city? Will everyday existence be transformed by big data and its broad scale application to a range of public services and other central issues? This thoughtful set of meditations was released in June 2014 by scholars at the Wilson Center’s Urban Sustainability Laboratory. The cities profiled in this report are New York, Ahmedabad, Sao Paulo, and Beijing, and scholars with first-hand knowledge of each metropole present their own findings in this 24-page report. There’s much to think about here as the scholars make reference to public space transformation, urban agriculture, and economic development strategies of note.

Everett Massacre Collection

The Everett Massacre on November 5, 1916 was a tragic end to weeks of social unrest and general upheaval between labor and management around the world. This digital collection from the University of Washington Libraries documents labor’s perspective on the event, also known as Everett’s Bloody Sunday, through newspaper articles, postcards, photographs, and fliers. First-time visitors might wish to start with the essay titled, “What Happened That Day in Everett.” Visitors can browse the complete collection or check out the sample searches, such as “Everett Defense Newsletters” and “Seattle Union Record.”

[Source: Scout Report, Volume 20, Number 27, July 18, 2014]

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Jul 14 2014

New publications are available at the Scout Report!

Demos: Publications: Scouting for Skills

What’s a nation to do when the service sector continues to rise? How can various institutions respond to increased employer emphasis on “character” and “employability skills?” A number of political leaders have called for schools to change the way they approach this issue and this working paper from the Demos group (produced with the support of The Scout Association) suggests that participation in certain key extracurricular activities might be the answer. The study notes that “participation in Scouts provides a range of soft skills, opportunities and networks that improve young people’s employment prospects in later life.” Visitors will find much to enjoy in this paper and it’s worth sharing with folks in the fields of public policy, human development, and workforce training.

 

Papers of Governor C. Farris Bryant

Florida Governor C. Farris Bryant was an intriguing post-World War II politician who also served in the state legislature in the 1950s and 1960s. This digital collection brings together a range of his personal papers courtesy of the University of Florida Digital Collections Initiative. There are over 280 items here, including a fascinating 1962 video, Adapting the Atom to Florida Progress, and a range of campaign correspondence and promotional materials. Visitors can perform an advanced search across the materials or perform a full-text search. Interested visitors can also read through the complete finding guide for his papers.

[Source: Scout Report, Volume 20, Number 26, July 11, 2014]

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Jun 23 2014

New publications are available at the Scout Report!

Prosperity at a Crossroads: Targeting Drivers of Economic Growth for Greater Kansas City
A big question for many cities is “What’s next?” Can they count on growth in the medical sector or in higher education? Examining the environs around Kansas City, this thoughtful report from the Brookings Institution brings together some research on economic performance. The report was authored by a team of policy experts, including Amy Liu and Chad Shearer, and was released in June 2014. Visitors can read the executive summary on the site or may wish to simply look over the basic findings, which are front and center on this page. Some of the observations indicate the greater Kansas City area is confronting global and political forces that “require renewed attention on the core drivers of economic growth and prosperity.”

 

The United States and the Two Koreas, Part II: 1969-2010
How might one characterize the relationship between the Koreas and the United States over the past forty years or so? Well, to quote a popular social networking site, “It’s complicated.” This electronic briefing book from the National Security Archive at George Washington University brings together a wide range of declassified documents that provide insight into the political and security challenges on the peninsula under Presidents Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H.W. Bush. The nineteen items here include a report with a near-verbatim account of meetings between U.S. and North Korean military officers and the detailed “Guide to Working and Living in Nyongbyon, DPRK” that addresses some of the practical challenges associated with travel, living and working in North Korea.

 

[Source: Scout Report, Volume 20, Number 23, June 20, 2014]

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May 12 2014

New publications are available at the Scout Report!

Geography & Map Resources: University of Buffalo Libraries

It’s often difficult to find high-quality and well-curated lists of materials related to geography and cartography online. However, this collection created by David J. Bertuca, the subject librarian for geography at the University of Buffalo Libraries, serves as a rich trove of resources. The items here are divided into over a dozen headings, including Government Resources and Map Collections. Each area contains at least ten offerings with Bertuca’s own salient commentary on the contents of each site, tool, collection, or application. The Selected Blogs feature is a real treat as it includes links to the fun and informative worlds of Google Maps Mania and Strange Maps. Visitors can also contact Bertuca directly to suggest links or to inquire about other resources.

 

[Source: Scout Report, Volume 20, Number 18, May 9, 2014]

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Apr 25 2014

New publications are available at the Scout Report!

Learn More About Climate Change

The phrase “climate change” might be combative to some and confusing to others. The University of Colorado’s Office for University Outreach has worked with its scholars to create the Learn More About Climate (LMAC) site in order to translate climate change information into “resources and tools for teachers, policymakers, and citizens.” Here, visitors can make their way through eight different areas, including Topics, Lessons, Videos, and Initiatives. In the Lessons area, educators will find model lessons about climate change, such as “Mountain Pine Beetles,” “Evidence of Climate Change,” and “What Makes You Hot.” Additionally, the Videos section offers up some excellent short films on rising sea levels and species adaption as a result of climate change. Those interested in specific LMAC projects will enjoy the Initiatives section, as it offers up brief summaries of ongoing projects, complete with two great webinars on Climate Change Conversations.

 

Nature Soundmap

What does a humpback whale sound like? Or perhaps the White-cheeked Gibbon? The Nature Soundmap provides snippets of these sounds and much, much more. Visitors will find an interactive map of the world, complete with markers that allow audio wildlife travel from Central America to Central Asia a snap. Symphonies of animal noises can also be found here, as visitors can click on Greece to listen to “Summer Ambience” or France to find “Dawn in the Lezardrieux Forest.” Each marker includes information about the animal or setting profiled, along with a link to More Info for the generally curious. 

 

[Source: Scout Report, Volume 20, Number 15, April 18, 2014]

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Jul 15 2013

New publications are available at the Scout Report!

Federal Reserve Bank of New York: Data and Indicators


Each of the Federal Reserve Banks has its own outreach efforts, which include public lectures, discussion groups, and a panoply of materials related to financial reports, manufacturing trends, and topics both far-ranging and quite focused. This section of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s website brings together key reports and data sets divided into areas such as Dynamic Data and Maps from the New York Fed, Tools and Indicators from the New York Fed, and Key Data from the New York Fed. The reports here include quarterly trends for consolidated U.S. banking organizations, the indexes of coincident economic indicators, and the Empire Manufacturing Survey. This last one is quite important, as it includes a money survey of manufacturers across the state. Policy makers and other folks will appreciate the regional economic indicators charts and the very important real-time data set for macroeconomists created by the Philadelphia Fed as it includes time series snapshots of major microeconomic variables.

[Source: Scout Report, Volume 19, Number 28, July 12, 2013]

 

 

 

 

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Jul 05 2013

New publications are available at the Scout Report!

  1. Demos: A/V
  2. The Demos group in Britain conducts high-quality public policy research on a wide range of topics, including urban design, social assistance policies, and the housing market. Like many other think tanks, the group also produces a wide range of presentations on its work. This section of the site presents full-length programs like “Multi-Dimensional Poverty,” “The Future of Open Data,” and “How Labour Wins Again.” One of the programs that should not be missed is the conversation on “It’s Who You Know: The Power of Social Networks.” It’s a response by Richard Horton of The Lancet to another speech on social networks and it’s quite insightful. All told, there are about three dozen programs in the Video section, while the Audio area contains podcasts and speeches dating back to 2006. Two recommended programs are “The Power Gap” (on power in contemporary societies) and a conversation with Evgeny Morozov on the relationship between politics and the Internet.

  3. International Development in Practice: What Works in Development?
  4. The very title of this OpenCourseWare site asks a question that has bedeviled non-governmental organizations for decades: what works in development? Created by Professor Steve Relfenberg of the University of Notre Dame, this course explores diverse approaches to thinking about international development and processes that bring about individual and societal change. As with many OpenCourseWare offerings, your can ramble through the syllabus, readings, course schedule, lectures, discussions, and essay assignments. The Lectures area is worth a look, as it contains PowerPoint slides for discussions on Studying Haiti, Taking Ideas to Scale, and The Complex Worlds of Foreign Aid. The Discussion area contains video resources that complement each lecture. Courses cover various Areas of study such as Sociology, Political Sciences, Poverty Studies, Architecture, Physics, Civil Engineering, English etc. Finally, you can look over the Essay Assignments area and the very helpful Additional Resources section, which features links to the Poverty Action Lab at MIT and the United Nations Development Project

    [Source: Scout Report, Volume 19, Number 25, June 21, 2013]

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Jul 05 2013

New publications are available at the Scout Report!

Resources for Teaching Social Psychology

This website was created by Professor Jon Mueller of North Central College in order to help fellow professors teach a range of social psychology topics to their students. The resources here are divided into 10 areas, including Online Lectures, Examples of Concepts, and Class Assignments. The site is updated frequently, and visitors can click through each of these sections to get a sense of the offerings. The Topics Resources area contains helpful links and activities related to conformity, aggression, and group influence. Moving on, the site also includes links to other teaching psychology sites, including Science of Relationships and the GoCognitive project, which offers an online center for teaching in cognitive psychology and neuroscience.

[Source: Scout Report, Volume 19, Number 26, June 28, 2013]
 
 

 

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Jun 20 2013

New publications are available at the Scout Report!

  • Resident-Centered Community Building: What Makes It Different?
  • How do we build community? How can we learn from each other? What does it mean to create a community responsive to the needs of its occupants? The Aspen Institute recently took on the challenge of thinking about such matters. In 2012, the Institute, along with the Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation, sponsored a conference on community building. The participants in this exercise included resident activists, community organizers, and additional parties. This 25-page document presents some great findings from their work, along with some basic information on how other organizations might work to include a diverse set of participants in community-building activities. Some of these basic building blocks include “Meet people where they are” and “Be flexible about how people participate.”

  • Immigrant Assimilation into US Prisons, 1900-1930
  • The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) conducts research on a wide range of topics and its work is frequently cited by scholars around the world. This intriguing piece was authored by Carolyn M. Moehling and Anne Morrison Piehl and released in May 2013. The 39-page paper looks into the statistical patterns behind immigrant assimilation into US prisons from 1900-1930 by drawing on newly released data. Some of the initial findings from this work note that immigrants “rapidly assimilated to native incarceration patterns.” The introduction offers a bit of research literature overview which is quite helpful. Also, the report contains helpful figures, along with information on the authors’ methodology and statistical analysis.

    [Source: Scout Report, Volume 19, Number 24, June 14, 2013]

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