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Apr 25 2012

Latest resources from Urban Institute

  1. THE SIZE OF TAX PREFERENCES
  2. Tax expenditures are getting increased scrutiny from budget hawks and tax reformers. New Treasury estimates, released as part of President Obama’s recent budget, indicate that these tax preferences will reduce individual and corporate income tax revenues by almost $1.1 trillion in 2012. Those provisions will also increase spending on refundable tax credits by $91 billion and will reduce payroll and excise tax receipts by $113 billion. Together, tax expenditures will total almost $1.3 trillion this year.
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  3.  Institute’s Health Policy Center is tracking implementation of the Affordable Care Act in 10 states: Alabama, Colorado, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Virginia. Each case study chronicles successes and hurdles, with a special look at exchange establishment, private-market reforms, and preparations for Medicaid expansion.
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  4. At a conference cosponsored by the Urban Institute, the Pension Rights Center, and Covington & Burling, Institute fellow Eugene Steuerle presented options for allowing workers to purchase annuities within Social Security, as well as granting partial benefits to accommodate phased retirement. While such options technically exist today, they are buried deep within the maze of Social Security’s complex provisions. Simplifying and clarifying these options would enable workers to provide themselves with a greater degree of inflation-protected longevity insurance in retirement.
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  5. COMMENTARY ON HEALTH CARE
  6.  ”On health care, what’s ‘proper’?” - By Stan Dorn
    The most worrisome part of the Supreme Court’s three-day hearing on the Affordable Care Act completely escaped mention in all the oceans of real and virtual ink that were spilled to cover the case. Stan Dorn explains in his “proper” commentary for the McClatchy-Tribune News Service.
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  7. VIDEO ON THE RICH AND TAXES
  8. Watch a spirited debate on such pressing issues as whether there should be a “Buffett Rule” to ensure that high-income taxpayers pay a minimum tax rate.
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  9. FRESH DATA ON OLDER AMERICANS
  10. Retirement Account Balances (Updated 4/12)” - By Barbara Butrica and Philip Issa

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    [Source: Urban Institute]

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Oct 03 2011

Latest reports from IssueLab

  1. Attitudes and Beliefs of Job Development Professionals Toward Employers
  2. Contributing organization(s): Heldrich Center for Workforce Development. Job development and placement professionals assist people with disabilities to secure, maintain, and advance in employment and thus have an important role in achieving quality employment outcomes for job seekers they represent. This research, conducted in NJ and MD, describes findings related to the attitudes and beliefs of job development professionals toard employers and the employment process…

     

  3. Chicago Recovery Partnership Evaluation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
  4. Contributing organization(s): The Chicago Community Trust. From 2009-2011, the City of Chicago and Cook County received a total of $2.35 billion in funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act [ARRA]. The stimulus money was allocated to seven areas: education, basic needs, transportation and infrastructure, housing and energy, public safety, broadband and workforce development. The Chicago Recovery Partnership Evaluation of ARRA analyzes the impact of the stimulus spending…

     

  5. Civic Engagement, Volunteerism and Charitable Giving: Americans Retiring in Mexico’s Coastal Communities
  6. Contributing organization(s): International Community Foundation. This study examines whether the American commitment to volunteerism and charitable giving is as evident among U.S. retirees in other countries as it is in the U.S., and in particular, how committed U.S. retirees in their adopted Mexican communities are engaged in civic engagement and charitable giving. As baby boomers - - the generation of 77 million Americans born between 1946 and 1964 - - retire, they represent a tremendous… 

     

  7. Creating Shared Value: A How-to Guide for the New Corporate (R)evolution
  8. Contributing organization(s): FSG Social Impact Advisors. Creating Shared Value (CSV) requires comprehensive and sustained efforts across a corporation. Drawing heavily on real-life examples, this report identifies ten key building blocks that together form a blueprint for translating CSV into action, and explores how companies can get started on that process…

     

  9. Evaluating Workforce Programs: A Guide to What Policymakers Need to Know to Structure Effective, User-Friendly Evaluations
  10. Contributing organization(s): Heldrich Center for Workforce Development. This brief discusses the value and purpose of program evaluations, highlights different evaluation tools and techniques, and illustrates how policy makers and program managers can structure and implement evaluations of workforce development programs…

     

  11. Graduating to Success in Employment: How Social Media Can Aid College Students in the Job Search
  12. Contributing organization(s): Heldrich Center for Workforce Development. This issue brief, the second in a series on social media in workforce development, explores how college career service centers can assist college students and recent college graduates in using social media as part of their job search…

     

  13. The Greening of U.S. Retirement Destinations in Mexico: Emerging Issues and Trends in Coastal Communities
  14. Contributing organization(s): International Community Foundation. This report analyzes environmentally specific consumer perceptions and preferences among U.S. retirees and second home buyers in Mexican coastal communities, including recycling, reducing consumption, and green building. In addition, the report reviews how U.S. retirees are addressing the environment independently in Mexico and how developers can capitalize on growing consumer interest in “greener” living. Finally, the…

     

  15. The Impact of Cutting Social Security Cost of Living Adjustments on the Living Standards of the Elderly
  16. Contributing organization(s): Center for Economic and Policy Research. During the negotiations over raising the debt ceiling, President Obama proposed cutting the annual cost of living adjustment for Social Security by switching to an index that would show a lower measured rate of inflation. This alternative index, the chained consumer price index (CCPI-U), shows an annual rate of inflation that averages approximately 0.3 percentage points less than the consumer price index (CPI-W) that is…

     

  17. Linking Audiences to News: A Network Analysis of Chicago Websites
  18. Contributing organization(s):  The Chicago Community Trust. The mass media model, which sustained news and information in communities like Chicago for decades, is being replaced by a “new news ecosystem” consisting of hundreds of websites, podcasts, video streams and mobile applications. In 2009, The Chicago Community Trust set out to understand this ecosystem, assess its health and make investments in improving the flow of news and information in Chicagoland. The report you are… 

     

  19. News That Matters: An Assessment of Chicago’s Information Landscape
  20. Contributing organization(s): The Chicago Community Trust. The Community News Matters project of The Chicago Community Trust conducted surveys and focus groups of the general public, local leaders and low-income residents to assess the level to which critical information needs of democracies are being well-met in the Chicago region and to identify critical information gaps and deficiencies in Chicago’s information landscape that may need to be addressed…

     

  21. Open to All? Different Cultures, Same Communities
  22. Contributing organization(s): The Chicago Community Trust. Produced for the Interfaith Housing Center of the Northern Suburbs with the support of the Chicago Community Trust, this report aims to better understand immigrants living in the northern suburbs of Chicago — who they are, where they live in relation to housing patterns and conditions, and the extent to which they exert political influence on local housing decisions. It was produced as part of The Chicago Community Trust’s…

     

  23. The Promise of Citywide Charter Strategies
  24. Contributing organization(s): FSG Social Impact Advisors. Charter school enrollment is on the rise in many urban areas. In fact, 56% of all public charter schools are located in urban areas, and 10 of our nation’s largest school districts now have 20,000 students enrolled in public charter schools. With this growth in the charter movement, there is an increasing need for local infrastructure support through technical services, advocacy, and coordination. This report examines the potential…

     

  25. Talking About Poverty in a Jobs and Economy Framework
  26. Contributing organization(s): Center for Economic and Policy Research. Reducing poverty substantially is not a small project. Unfortunately, only 1 percent of Americans point to “poverty” when asked about the most important problems facing the nation. This presents anti-poverty activists with a strategic problem: we need major policy reforms to substantially reduce poverty, but hardly any Americans — including, it must be said, those officially categorized as poor — view…

     

  27. What Does the Census Tell Us About Metropolitan Chicago?
  28. Contributing organization(s): The Chicago Community Trust. This publication examines key trends in population shifts across the metro Chicago region (defined as Cook, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, Lake, McHenry and Will Counties). Among the report highlights are the following: 1. Metropolitan Chicago is home to 8.4 million persons, and the area grew by 3.5 percent between 2000 and 2010. 2. The Metro population is shifting westward…

     

  29. Who’s Above the Social Security Payroll Tax Cap?
  30. Contributing organization(s): Center for Economic and Policy Research. When most workers look at their pay stubs, they can see that the Social Security payroll tax rate is 12.4 percent — with the employee and employer each paying 6.2 percent. But many workers do not know that any annual wages above $106,800 are not taxed by Social Security. In other words, a worker who makes twice the Social Security wage cap — $213,600 per year — pays Social Security tax on only half of his or her earnings…
     

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